Mittwoch, 6. November 2019

Songtang Slow down effect

I wonder.
How much did the Songtang terrain slow down Yannick? How much ZhuoYe?

I measure length of the chosen routes (2DRerun course-setting tool) and divide by time. For Yannick both Laufen and Songtang.  For ZhuoYe only Songtang (no GPS available) and official length in Laufen.

The result:
Yannick drops by 2.4 km/h. ZhuoYe drops by 0.2 km/h

Kommentare:

Anonym hat gesagt…

I wonder, for which course would you expect faster running Speed?

Switzerland:
2-4 "technical controls", 2 hard route choices
+/- 50 sharp turns
average street width >5 m

China:
12-14 "technical controls", 4 hard route choices
+/- 75 sharp turns
average street width <2 m

M.Lerjen hat gesagt…

@anonymus. In Switzerland.

Fabian Hertner hat gesagt…

The official length of the course in Laufen (4.0km) was measured with SprintOAnalyzer. SprintOAnalyzer is a Tool to automatically measure the lengths of the best routes of a routechoice in Sprint Orienteering. Once the map (jpg) is calibrated, the Tool analyzes the map and it can calculate the shortest routes between two points of your choice (and some extra features). To make some advertisment: The new state-of-the-Art Tool for people like you who like to do analyzes and are tired to draw routes in 2DReRun;) The Tool can be downloaded here with installation guide and Instructions: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/6mb7wou3bq16ydr/AAD_5tm13V1p3If8PBvaJYAOa?dl=0

the connection to your post:
SprintOAnalyzer measures the theoretically shortest path and goes very tight around corners. When you draw your route with 2DReRun you usually get a longer path. From experience this difference is around some few percent what will give you a higher speed for ZhuoYe in Laufen. I recommend you to either measure Yannik's route in Laufen with SprintOAnalyzer or ZhuoYe's with 2DReRun to make sure your comparison is correct.

Of course i recommend to use SprintOAnalyzer =D

M.Lerjen hat gesagt…

@Fabian Hertner: Thank you for the advertisement. :-) Looks good.

In the actual case we just have the problem, that we do not know ZhuoYe's route choices in Laufen to get a more precise value of his actual running distance. The SprintOAnalyzer value I took for that part is the minimum running distance, thus ZhuoYe ran this speed or faster.

As it is hard to tell from the GPS which way they actually ran (looks like Matthias Kyburz takes the direct route through the dark green to the 9th control ??) a more precise measurement method would not make the result more precise. But altogether I see the following general results supported: Yannick ran much slower in China. Also ZhuoYe ran slower, but is drop was much smaller.

Fabian Hertner hat gesagt…

Just wanted to take the chance to spread my Tool;)

Leo hat gesagt…

Ok, Yannik run slower in China, but why You think - it is because of terrain? Orienteering is a complex sport and You can not make conclusions about speed only from terrain.
If I compare the legibility of map in Laufen and Songtang - I see a big difference (If some one don't see - let's try to ask IOF MC for Legibility Test results.). Legibility of map has a very big influence on orienteering (speed or mistakes). If less legibility of map has no influence on running speed - runner must have "hawk eyes" or more information about course.
People today talk only about sprint and forget - 99% runners in Middle must be DSQ because of map, made by European mappers and accepted by European experts. All maps was checked and accepted. How it was possible?!
I'm not pro or contra, I want to say only one - China was ready for World Cup, but IOF was not ready for China. IOF must solve inside problems, before second round. Better maps, more marshals, more video = less discussions. #IOF, go home! ;-)

Leo hat gesagt…

@Fabian Hertner - Thank You for Your software! Well done!

Thomas hat gesagt…

Just to add one more mad theory to all the conspiracy that is going on around here and elsewhere: All European athletes were staying at one hotel in Foshan, while all Chinese athletes stayed at another. So hey, who knows what was in the food (of either hotels, good or bad!), and which sonic warfare devices were in action to reduce the European athletes’ capabilities?